Flip flop: my failed experiment with flipped classroom R instruction

I don’t know if this terminology is common outside of library circles, but it seems like the “flipped classroom” has been all the rage in library instruction lately.  The idea is that learners do some work before coming to the session (like read something or watch a video lecture), and then the in-person time is spent on doing more activities, group exercises, etc.  As someone who is always keen to try something new and exciting, I decided to see what would happen if I tried out the flipped classroom model for my R classes.

Actually, teaching R this way makes a lot of sense.  Especially if you don’t have any experience, there’s a lot of baseline knowledge you need before you can really do anything interesting.  You’ve got to learn a lot of terminology, how the syntax of R works, boring things like what a data frame is and why it matters.  That could easily be covered before class to save the in person time for the more hands-on aspects.  I’ve also noticed a lot of variability in terms of how much people know coming into classes.  Some people are pretty tech savvy when they arrive, maybe even have some experience with another programming language.  Other people have difficulty understanding how to open a file.  It’s hard to figure out how to pace a class when you’ve got people from all over that spectrum of expertise.  On the other hand, curriculum planning would be much easier if you could know that everyone is starting out with a certain set of knowledge and build off of it.

The other reason I wanted to try this is just the time factor.  I’m busy, really busy.  My library’s training room is also hard to book because we offer so many classes.  The people I teach are busy.  I teach my basic introduction to R course as a 3-hour session, and though I’d really rather make it 4 hours, even finding a 3-hour window when I and the room are both available and people are likely to be able to attend is difficult.  Plus, it would be nice if there was some way to deliver this instruction that wasn’t so time-intensive for me.  I love teaching R – it’s probably my favorite thing I do in my job and I’d estimate I’ve taught close to 500 researchers how to code.  I generally spend around 9 hours a month teaching R, plus another 4-6 hours doing prep, administrative stuff, and all the other things that have to get done to make a class function.  That’s a lot of time, and though I don’t at all mind doing it, I’d definitely be interested in any sort of way I could streamline that work without having a negative impact on the experience of learning R from me.

For all these reasons, I decided to experiment with trying out a flipped classroom model for my introduction to R class.  I had grand plans of making a series of short video tutorials that covered bite-sized pieces of learning R.  There would be a bunch of them, but they’d be about 5 minutes each.  I arranged for the library to get Adobe Captivate, which is very cool video tutorial software, and these tutorials are going to be so awesome when I get around to making them.  However, I had already scheduled the class for today, February 28, and I hadn’t gotten around to making them yet.  Fortunately, I had a recording of a previous Intro to R class I’d taught, so I chopped the relevant parts of that up into smaller pieces and made a YouTube playlist that served as my pre-class work for this session, probably about two and a half hours total.

I had 42 people were either signed up or on the waitlist at the end of last week.  I think I made the class description pretty clear – that this session was only an hour, but you did have to do stuff before you got there.  I sent out an email with the link to the video reminding people that they would be lost in class if they didn’t watch this stuff.  Even so, yesterday morning, the last of the videos had only 8 views, and I knew at least two of those were from me checking the video to make sure it worked.  So I sent out another email, once again imploring them to watch the videos before they came to class and to please cancel their registration and sign up for a regular R class if this video thing wasn’t for them.

By the time I taught the class this afternoon, 20 people had canceled their registration.  Of the remaining 22, 5 showed up.  Of the 5 that showed up, it quickly became apparent to me that none of them had watched the videos.  I knew no one was going to answer honestly if I asked who had watched them, so I started by telling them to read in the CSV file to a data frame.  This request is pretty fundamental, and also pretty much the first thing I covered in the videos, so when I was met with a lot of blank stares, I knew this experiment had pretty much failed.  I did my best to cover what I could in an hour, but that’s not much, so instead of this being a cool, interactive class where people ended up feeling empowered and ready to go write code, I got the feeling those people left feeling bewildered and like they wasted an hour.  One guy who had come in 10 minutes late came up to me after class and was like, “so this is a programming language?  What can you do with it?”  And I kind of looked at him like….whaaaat?  It turned out he hadn’t even registered for the class to begin with, much less done any of the pre-class work – he had been in the library and saw me teaching and apparently thought it looked interesting so he decided to wander in.

I felt disappointed by this failed experiment, but I’m not one to give up at the first sign of failure, so I’ve been thinking about how I could make this system work.  It could just be that this model is not suited to people in the setting where I teach.  I am similar to them – a busy, working professional who knows this is useful and I should learn it, but it’s hard to find the time – and I think about what it would take for me to do the pre-class work.  If I had the time and the videos were decent enough quality, I think I’d do it, but honestly chances are 50-50 that I’d be able to find the time.  So maybe this model just isn’t made for my community.

Before I give up on this experiment entirely, though, I’d love to hear from anyone who has tried this kind of approach for adult learners.  Did it work, did it not?  What went well and what didn’t?  And of course, being the data queen that I am, I intend to collect some data.  I’m working on a modified class evaluation for those 5 brave souls who did come to get some feedback on the pre-class work model, and I’m also planning on sending a survey out to the other 38 people who didn’t come to see what I can find out from them.  Data to the rescue of the flipped class!

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